Colorist spotlight: Mags | Prema New York


Spring has sprung in NYC, and what goes better with a season change than a color change?

 

We sat down with one of Prema New York’s colorists, Maggie Lawrenson, to pick her brain about BLONDES

Describe your best AND worst hairstyles as a child.

Best: My first holy communion updo. Definitely my first taste of vanity. Worst: Bleaching the box dye out of my hair so I could be “blonde” (aka brassy orange)

 

What’s your specialty?

I’d have to say my specialty is blonding, specifically balayage. But I love it all!

 

What are most clients asking you for these days?

Whether it’s a double process or balayage, most clients are requesting icy ashy blonde. They all want to look like the mother of dragons! (Did you know? Khaleesi’s wig isn’t white! It’s a blonde wig that gets toned in post-production with lighting and computer effects.)

 

What would you like to see/do more of with blondes?

I’d really love to get to play with more rosy, pink toned blondes. I’m also so ready for sheer, warmer tones as opposed to everything being so icy.

What do you think a big misconception is within the blonde world?

Going through Instagram and hair blogs there’s such an emphasis on warmth being a bad thing. Brassiness and warmth are totally different; brassy to me is lightener that hasn’t been lifted all the way or hasn’t processed fully but most people think brassy is any type of warmth. There’s intentional gold; beautiful buttery blondes – think Reese Witherspoon or Gwenyth Paltrow. A cool toned blonde is still beautiful don’t get me wrong, but it’s such a trend at this point that seeing something other than that is super refreshing.

 

What is key to achieving the ultimate balayage look?

A good base color is important because balayage is typically only 2-3 levels lighter than your base color. Balayage is intended to give you a natural, sun kissed look so when your base is super dark and you have these really bright highlights throughout, it doesn’t read as a natural sunkissed look! I’d stay away from a “base break” or a high-lift toner, which will create a bit too much warmth throughout whereas lifting your base leaves you with a clean canvas to work with. If you’re wanting to achieve overall brightness I’d recommend lifting the client’s base first, then a beautifully-placed balayage to create dimension while keeping a natural tone-on-tone look.

 Follow us at @premahair to keep up with the latest things we’re up to, and be sure to book in your complimentary color consultation with Mags and make your hair dreams a reality. Click here to book! 

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